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You have already forgotten high school, but it still affects you in this unexpectedly

You have already forgotten high school, but it still affects you in this unexpectedly


You have already forgotten high school, but it still affects you in this unexpectedly


The social hierarchy of secondary sticks with our psyche overcame its past. In addition to remembering the names of "cool guys" in their class better than most of the materials they learned in high school, research shows that the popularity of high school affects us as adults. Basically, because our brain literally mingle during puberty, things like the ones we remember as popular in college can shape the way we treat experiences, even into adulthood.

Author Mitch Prinstein explains how it works in his most recent, popular book: The Power of Sympathy Read in an Obsessed World. Prinstein said that because our brains are developing dramatically during these formative years, "the experiences we have during these critical years have the potential to affect the brain we are going to live with for the rest of our lives." This explains why most of us have beautiful strong feelings about the popularity of the same high school years later.

One of the biggest forms of popularity of high school defines our social perspective is the "processing of social information." It is fasting, but complex, to judge social situations and decide how to respond accordingly. Prinstein uses the example instinctively to say "I'm sorry" when another person is in front of you. "The decisions we take milliseconds in such reactions reveal a form of bias that goes back to our past," Prinstein said. Because our adult brain begins to form in the high school hallways, many of our social survival skills are also formed in these spaces.

You have already forgotten high school, but it still affects you in this unexpectedly

Some research suggests that the social force to be popular comes from prehistoric times. Because people would live most of their lives among the same small group of people, and evolutionary important social position was for practical purposes. Being desirable and admired was a survival skill both in literal and social sense.

The effects of popularity could also shape our brain the opposite. A 2015 study found that the brains of popular people tend to have one thing in common: to be more attuned to the popularity of others. The study suggests that people become so popular they are done because they are interested in popularity in neurology. This research also suggests another factor that contributes to a person's popularity is thus, the perception that they are very popular. We tend to be drawn to the people we perceive as "popular", although I do not really like these people, so these people are more popular. This might explain why we like it: watching reality shows about celebrities or paying attention to what the good guys at our school were, even if we did not get into these circles.

You have already forgotten high school, but it still affects you in this unexpectedly

Perhaps this all seems counter-intuitive to his previous notions of popularity. Being popular is not supposed to matter in the long run, is it? As Prinstein in The Guardian writes, "The more we understand popularity and how it affects us throughout our lives, the more we risk breaking the cycle of interpersonal experiences that started in school."

So, you do not need to go back to your high school days to try to be like the type children (location sigh of relief) or just try to avoid them altogether. The Prinstein work is simply a psychological explanation why we could still face the popularity of pain, albeit unconsciously, long after we have forgotten ourbox office suits.


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